6 new e-books

Six new resources have just become available. They are designed for facilitators/leaders of teams. They provide 135 games. The following info graphic explains the resources available at www.gamestodevelop.com.au

infographic32

Advertisements

Relationship of movement to learning – 3 recent research studies

The connection between the student’s ability to learn and their physical activity has been known for decades. But the implementation of the practice of physical activity during learning has not been consistently practised. The use of games in your team building program can add the physical activity that according to these reports will improve the learning that will occur.

There are many articles in this area but I am confining my references to three of the latest reports. They are all from the U.S.A. and have been published in the last three years. The most recent report was published in May of this year by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

Children who are more active show greater attention, have faster cognitive processing speed, and perform better on standardized academic tests than children who are less active… [They went on to add] In addition, students should engage in vigorous or moderate-intensity physical activity throughout the school day, such as through recess and classroom time dedicated to physical activity.

Institute of Medicine (2013), Educating the Student Body – taking physical activity and physical education to school,  National Academy of Science, Washington D.C., U.S.A. http://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2013/Educating-the-Student-Body/EducatingTheStudentBody_rb.pdf [accessed 15/10/13]

When learners are asked to stay sedentary for long periods of time they lose focus and and find it hard to concentrate. They may even become bored. But with a short break for some physical activity, they become energised and more attentive.

movement and learning - increase movement increases the ability to learn

The next report is from the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and was published in 2010. The authors studied 43 research articles and reports and made summaries of the findings. The most relevant quote in the Executive Summary for us with respect to movement and learning is:

Nine studies (reported in nine articles) explored physical activity that occurred in classrooms apart from physical education classes and recess. In general, these studies explored short physical activity breaks (5–20 minutes) or ways to introduce physical activity into learning activities that were either designed to promote learning through physical activity or provide students with a pure physical activity break. These studies examined how the introduction of brief physical activities in a classroom setting affected cognitive skills (aptitude, attention, memory) and attitudes (mood); academic behaviors (on-task behavior, concentration); and academic achievement (standardized test scores, reading literacy scores, or math fluency scores). Eight of the nine studies found positive associations between classroom-based physical activity and indicators of cognitive skills and attitudes, academic behavior, and academic achievement; none of the studies found negative associations.

CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) 2010, The Association Between School-Based Physical Activity, including Physical Education, and Academic Performance, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Executive Summary, page 2. http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/health_and_academics/pdf/pa-pe_paper.pdf

When using games in team building programs, they are generally 5-20 minutes in length. Thus, they should have a similar impact with corresponding learning improvements.

In a 2010 study in the USA involving 2000 principals, they found:

Key findings from the survey include:
• Four out of five principals report that recess has a positive impact on academic achievement.
• Two-thirds of principals report that students listen better after recess and are more focused in class.
• Virtually all believe that recess has a positive impact on children’s social development (96 percent) and general well-being (97 percent).

Gallup Poll (2010), Principals say recess has a positive impact on learning; students are more focused, listen better after recess, Robert Wood Johnson Institute, http://www.rwjf.org/en/about-rwjf/newsroom/newsroom-content/2010/02/first-of-its-kind-gallup-poll-links-recess-to-academic-achieveme.html [accessed 15/10/2013]

Recess is slightly longer than games that you might use in a team building program but the concept bears comparison.

Based on the results quotes from these reports, inclusion of movement in your training programs will improve the participants’ ability to learn your program.

Are you ready to start building your team? 8 questions to consider

Preparation for any job can be the most important part of the job. Are you ready? Here are 8 questions for you to consider as part of your preparation.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What do you want this team to accomplish?

You need to be clear about what you want the new team to accomplish before you start the process. You don’t need to know the specifics but you need to know the general objectives. For example if this is to be a SRC team then you need to know if there are specific tasks that the school executive and/or student body want them to achieve this year over and above the general goal of student governance and all that entails in your context.

Along the way the team will also achieve other goals. These will be determined during the life of the team and can not be foreseen at the beginning. You can only prepare for the known not the unknown.

What skills will they need to accomplish this?

Once you know the general goals to be achieved then you need to consider the skills that the team will need to be able to accomplish these goals. Some of these will be the skills that any team will need. Others will be skills specific to the jobs this team is expected to accomplish. Some of these skills may not be needed in the initial team training. They may suit an on the job training model or point of need training.

It would be helpful if you could divide the skills into those needed now and those needed later. This will make your planning for the initial training easier to organise.

What roles will team members play?

The answer to this question is directly related to the type of team you are developing. Different teams will require different roles. Once determined, you will need a set of role descriptions that are easy to understand. These should include the potential extra skills required to effectively function in these roles.

In addition, some teams have a hierarchical structure but many have a horizontal structure. If the team is hierarchical, then everyone has a base set of skills but each level of the hierarchy will require extra skills. Even in horizontally structured teams there may be specialised roles – for example the communication sub group may need further skills in using the specific websites for the team.

What cultural factors will impact on the team?

You cannot completely prepare for which cultural factors will impact on the team life. You should have an understanding of the main cultural impacts in your community. You will also know the composition of the body from which your potential team will be selected. The first factors you should consider will be the possible cultural factors that may impinge on the team training. One example would be: girls from traditional Eastern European families  will not be allowed to stay late after school or go on overnight excursions.

Another example may be language. If the population from which the team members will be selected contains a high percentage of new migrants from non English speaking backgrounds then the possibility will be high that the depth of understanding written and spoken language will be a consideration.

What barriers may exist to full participation by disabled members?

Most venues for community meeting are now being made more accessible for all. You cannot be fully prepared for bars to participation until you know the nature of any disability that a team member has. Even then, you will have no way of knowing about any injuries that may occur that result in temporary disability. Once the team members are selected then you will be able to determine what barriers exist for the long term participation of each member in the team activities. You can then work towards minimising them. You will also be able to plan activities that are inclusive for all.

What information needs to be available to potential team members?

This is one of the most important steps in your preparation. The membership of the team will determine the possible effectiveness and/or success of the team. You need potential team members to have as much information as possible about both the goals of the team and their possible role. When equipped with this information, each potential team member will be able to make as informed a decision as is possible for their maturity about whether they want to be part of the team.

Another consideration is how to present the information. You want potential team members to know what they are becoming involved in but you don’t want to scare away potential effective team members. You may need to provide some personal counselling with candidates you feel would make excellent team members.

What method will be used to select team members?

There is a tendency when team members are younger for the adults to select them. This is the process used in many businesses also where managers select teams. This could be an effective procedure for some teams. But there are other methods that can be used. In some cases such as peer support, the selection process may be volunteers from a particular pool of students. Another example for teams such as the SRC there would need to be some form of representative selection.

Whatever selection process is used in your situation it is important to ensure that it works. You may find recommendations for change in last year’s evaluation. This is the time when you can examine the procedures currently in use and determine if changes would improve it.

What games would be most in tune with your goals?

Once you know the answers to all of the above questions, then you can work through the selection of games and choose ones that meet your unique needs. Each game should come with a set of aims or objectives. You can select those games that best suit your aims for skills development. You can also examine the procedures for the games and determine full participation of all is possible based on your cultural and potential physical impairments. This is when you can make variations to steps to provide total inclusion. You don’t want any team member sitting on the sidelines.

The lost art of gaming without a computer

In this age of constant digital inputs if you ask a young person what the term games means, their answer will most likely be about computer games. The fact that people can play fun and exciting games without a digital device is often quite surprising to them. The additional fact that they can play games with a group of people all in the same room may also be a foreign concept. They will know about team sports. But possibly not about team games.

So adding games to a team building program can not only be helpful in building the team, non computer games can add:

  • an element of novelty to the program
  • movement
  • face-to-face communication
  • freedom.

The novelty of adding non digital games to your team building program can add interest and anticipation into the sessions. Participants will look forward to the next game – e.g. what will it be, how might I achieve, what new way to have fun will I discover. This will help to motivate them to pay attention to the sessions so that they can complete their work and then move onto another game. The down side of being novel is that there will be a certain amount of inertia to overcome to get started in the first game. But once the inertia of trying something new has been overcome, the excitement of playing the game with their team mates will take over.

Movement in our lives is very important. Most involvement in digital activities is very sedentary. We are developing a generation where many mus

small group throwing around beach balls

cles are not being used enough. Low tech games at least require getting out of the chair and generally require a lot of movement. Since researchers have linked movement with learning in so many ways, low tech games will be helping the participants to learn, have fun plus focus their attention on the rest of the program.

Face-to-face communication seems to be a dying art form. The closest digital equivalent is Skype, FaceTime and other forms of video conferencing. All non-digital games require some form of face-to-face communication. It may be verbal or non-verbal or a combination of both. It may even require some writing or sharing of symbols. The more your participants communicate with each other the greater their skills will become in the various forms of communication.

Freedom from digital games allows freedom in so many ways. Some of these include freedom:

  • from the constraints placed on participants by the digital medium – for example:
    • Internet access
    • number of digital inputs available for a game
    • the size of the screen to enable everyone to see
    • the battery power or requirements for electrical outlets and cables
    • being able to hear from the device speakers or the requirements of amplification
    • limits imposed by the gaming programmers on the participants
  • to play games anywhere, in various locations at once, including outside
  • to have any size of team or large group participating at once with the fluidity of instantly changing the numbers playing during the game
  • to move around with total flexibility without worrying about damage occurring to electrical devices including inputs
  • to make your own noise
  • to let the creativity of the group modify the game or the leader to add variations on the spot.

Playing games without computers may be a dying art but it is one worth preserving. Why not add some non digital games to your team building program and see the difference they can make.